Teal Migration Reports

September 14th, 2023

The teal migration continues! With moderate concentrations in Missouri, South Carolina, and Arkansas, it would appear the highest concentrations of teal have made their way south to Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi.

In this iteration of our “follower feedback” map, we received roughly 120 responses from across the country about observations of teal across the United States and Canada. From this data we’ve created an observation-based teal migration map.

The teal migration continues! Moderate concentrations were reported in west-central Missouri along the Missouri River, as well as in northeast Arkansas and the marshes of South Carolina.

It would appear, based off of our followers’ feedback and observations, that the largest concentrations of teal that were once in the northern portions of the United States or along the major river systems of the central United States have moved onward.

Moderately-high concentrations of teal were reported across the majority of the southern United States, with the Delta of Mississippi, north-central Texas and the Rice Belt of Texas showing notable concentrations.

The most noteworthy area reporting a very large concentration of teal is south-central Louisiana and along the coastal marshes of Louisiana, where the word is its incredibly dry, but if you find water you’ll find “unreal amounts of teal.”

Teal Migration Report - 9/14/2023

September 8th, 2023

Teal have concentrated in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley, with a new wave concentrated in the northern United States poised to continue pushing south.

Teal Migration Report - 9/8/2023

In this iteration of our “follower feedback” map, we received roughly 90 responses from across the country about observations of teal across the United States and Canada. From this data we’ve created an observation-based teal migration map.

It would appear the teal that were congregated along the Red River in last week’s report continued moving southward and are now concentrated in the coastal marshes of Louisiana and in east Texas.

Generally speaking, across the entire Mississippi and Central Flyways, teal are moving through, so while reports are not of high concentrations country-wide, reports of some teal moving about are being sent in pretty much across the board.

In western and central Minnesota, reports went from average-at-best last week to relatively high this week, indicating a new push of teal have moved into the northern United States in recent days.

Good luck to those taking to the field this weekend for the opener!

September 1st, 2023

Teal are on the move across the Central Flyway and Mississippi Flyway. Highest concentrations of teal are reported to be along the Red River, in southern Louisiana, and in western Missouri, with moderate concentrations in the upper Mississippi River, in western Minnesota, and along the Ohio River.

In this iteration of our “follower feedback” map, we received roughly 180 responses from across the country about observations of teal across the United States and Canada. From this data we’ve created an observation-based teal migration map.

Reports were consistent throughout Coastal Louisiana, where the number of was reportedly high in Vermillion, Cameron and Acadia parish.

In western Missouri—particularly in Henry, Johnson and Clay counties—teal were reportedly making their way through in high numbers. Admittedly however, as consistent as the reports of high counts of teal were the reports that those teal were on the move, likely headed out of the area.

Lastly, while in no one area along the entire stretch of the Red River were there reports of large numbers of teal, reports indicated there were teal moving along the entire stretch between Texas and Oklahoma and into Louisiana.

Lastly, reports indicated moderate concentrations of teal along the Ohio River, the upper Mississippi River, and in western Minnesota—specifically Otter Tail County.

Teal Migration Report - 9/1/2023

Follow the Migration

About our “Follower Feedback” Maps

While our Migration Map and other applications are backed by scientific counts and calculations, sometimes nothing compares to the power of shared information. Infrequently throughout the season–particularly the early teal season and Conservation Order snow goose season–we reach out to our community and inquire about their observations from the field. We’ve dubbed these our “Follower Feedback” maps. 

The data of these maps is received through surveys sent to our followers and users where relative concentrations of waterfowl is sought down to the county and state level. We aren’t asking for information about anyone’s secret honey hole–just whether or not their in your “neck of the woods”.

If you’d like to get involved, follow us on Instagram; we post our information requests on a weekly basis in our Instagram “stories”.

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If you have questions, please contact us.

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